17.09.2019
9 minutes of reading time

Strong and innovative from Alsace to Sub-Saharan Africa

In 2018, Frauscher founded its own location in France – which reflects the effort that the company invests in increasing customer proximity to learn from global markets, as Managing Director Mayank Tripathi explains.

uality before quantity: Being present in various rail markets with our own locations is part of the intensive growth strategy that Frauscher has been pursuing for several years now. “The focus of this concept is not on gaining size, but the principle of working closely with customers, speaking their language and knowing the exact conditions of individual markets.”
Mayank Tripathi Managing Director Frauscher Sensor Technology France S.A.R.L.
Already in 1994, Frauscher provided a project in Algeria with its robust wheel sensors (archive image)

Before joining Frauscher in 2016, he worked as an Engineer, Sales Manager and Sales and Marketing Director for a railway company in France with global presence. Mr Tripathi has a total of 15 years of experience in the railway signalling industry. “In addition to France, we are also active in the countries of North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. Frauscher has been active in the Maghreb region in particular since the nineties. We have been able to significantly intensify our relations with these markets in recent years. With the foundation of the office in France in 2018, a new milestone was set in this process”, he explains.

Eliminating barriers

As with others all over the globe, the location in France reflects the effort that Frauscher invests in increasing customer proximity by eliminating barriers in terms of language and geographical distances. “We think that both sides can benefit from this. Being present in a market eases the exchange with customers significantly. More transparency gives us the possibility to learn and to ultimately provide our customers with exactly what they need within stipulated time frames”, Mr Tripathi says. The office in Alsace is located in Haguenau and hosts a team of five highly professional employees. Axle counter equipment on-site allows for the organisation of training with customers. “We do as well organise training sessions at our customer’s own facilities – or invite them to our training centre in Austria. Whatever meets their individual requirements”, Mr Tripathi adds.

The office in France hosts a room with equipment for training sessions
discussing the future

Considering standards

Supporting markets in an optimal way does not only require close collaboration with customers, as Tripathi knows. It also necessitates the understanding of and participation in discussions about future proof standards, norms and processes. In late spring 2019, Frauscher became a member of the Federation des Industries Ferroviaires (FIF). “We are very proud of that and consider our membership extremely valuable. We can now contribute to the process of creating France’s future railways, by participating in according discussion with our know-how. On the other hand we can then work on specific solutions according to defined local requirements which we can learn to understand better”, Mr Tripathi says.

Predestined solutions

Based on highly robust wheel sensors, Frauscher axle counters work reliably even under harsh conditions

Against that backdrop, Frauscher France is perfectly equipped to support their customer’s modernisation projects in all its markets throughout various segments – metros and trams as well as long-distance connections on which freight and passenger trains are operated. “Based on its modularity and freely selectable interfaces, products such as the Frauscher Advanced counter FAdC are predestined to support French system integrators and operators in changing from track circuits to axle counters. Depending on the requirements of the existing system, the FAdC can be connected to the interlocking via relay or Ethernet interface. The latter can be realised by implementing customer specific software protocols or our own Frauscher Safe Ethernet FSE. Due to its beneficial capabilities, this axle counter is used in countries all over the globe, including Australia, Austria, Poland, Switzerland or UK for example, where it has proven its capabilities under manifold conditions. At the moment, we are working on homologating our axle counters with major operators in our markets. We do already have several trials in place. Additionally, several Tram projects using the FAdC are in the stage of realisation, for example Tram Bordeaux, Tram Casablanca or Tram Avignon.”

Spiral of development and progress

Besides strengthening the company’s position in global markets, being on-site also supports Frauscher in terms of working on innovations, as Mr Tripathi explains: “We do as well use inputs from global railway markets to strengthen our portfolio. Working closely with customers helps us to identify future proof concepts, which consider new digital possibilities. Thereby we make sure to work on solutions that will enable the industry to fully utilise the potential that digitalisation offers.”

For example, Frauscher already provides its customers with various tools, such as the Frauscher Diagnostic System FDS or the Remote Monitoring Display RMD, which support preventive maintenance strategies. Furthermore, the Frauscher Tracking Solutions FTS offer interesting features in this context. “The continuous real-time condition monitoring of track and train components has often been discussed with customers in our markets in detail. The applications being considered cover a very broad spectrum and we look forward to working on a number of exciting projects here in future”, Mr Tripathi says.

Frauscher provides its customers with innovative tools which support preventive maintenance strategies and other future oriented applications.
The SENSiS Detection Point SDP works like an intelligent device on track.

The new SENSiS System is another example of how the company keeps one step ahead: “We presented SENSiS for the first time at InnoTrans 2018 and were overwhelmed by the great interest and positive feedback. With a newly developed sensor, working as an intelligent device on the track, this system sets new standards. The evaluation of the sensor signal takes place in the sensor – i.e. directly on the rail. Using a dedicated bus system, digitised data is transferred directly from the SENSiS Detection Point SDP to the SENSiS Processing Unit SPU in the indoor location. The possibility of building ring architectures enables immense savings by reducing the cabling required. In addition, the sensor is able to collect information on temperature and vibration. In the overall package, this system opens up completely new possibilities and represents the latest generation of track vacancy detection against a backdrop of an increasing digitalisation of the railway industry”, Mr Tripathi summarises.

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